Featured Post

Crucified Before the Foundation of the World

"Crucified before the foundation of the world." What does that mean? How could that even happen? Historians and archaeologists ta...

Monday, April 24, 2017

Psalms 96-100

Psalms 96

There is no notation of authorship.
This Psalm is totally praise. The writer praises God in singing, and he calls for a new song. He calls for the worshippers to praise God's salvation. He calls us to declare His deed among the nations.
He is great and worthy of praise. 

The Psalmist is excited about the glory and reverence of God. He reminds us that the gods of other nations are idols not worthy of reverence, but the Lord made heaven and earth. Splendor and majesty surround Him and strength and glory are his sanctuary.

Assign glory and honor to God. The writer uses the word "ascribe" to emphasize the authority we should place on the name of God.
He calls us to bring an offering into His courts. He does not want burnt offerings, but a contrite heart is the sacrifice he asks us to bring.

He calls us to proclaim His works among the nations, to repeat the facts of his glory and His blessing, to be attentive to His creation. We are to rejoice before him and bring honor and glory to His name. He will judge the earth.

Psalms 97

Again, the author is not noted.
He declares God's authority and power. God is cloaked in darkness, righteousness, and justice. Fire goes before him. The earth trembles, the mountains melt, and all see his majesty.

The people of the whole earth see His majesty, and those who love the Lord hate evil. Zion and Judah rejoice and light shines on the righteous.  Rejoice in the Lord and Praise His holy name.

Psalms 98

Psalms 98 returns to the praise of God with song and the author uses the voice to magnify the glory and salvation God offers to the people of the earth. He mentions shouts and jubilation as acts of worship.
He also calls for making music on the harp and the blast of the ram's horn and trumpets.

Let the sea resound, and everything in it, and all who live in the world. Let the rivers clap their hands and the mountains sing for joy. All this rejoicing and celebration comes in honor of God's judgment of the world in righteousness.

Psalms 99

Psalms 99 describes and gives details of God's power to rule Heaven and earth. There is no place where He is not in control. The author lists individuals in the history of Israel who played a part in God's plan, but the glory and honor belong to God alone. This Psalms is compact and powerful claiming God's absolute control.

Psalms 100

This Psalm is noted to give grateful praise.
It is used often in worship and is powerful to remind worshippers of the power and majesty of God. Reading it communally, or individually, is an appropriate introduction to formal worship, to prepare for a service with your community of believers. 

Take time to dwell on the meaning of the phrases and enter with joy and gladness to be in His presence.

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Psalms 91-95

Psalms 91

This is one of the better-known Psalms. It is often read and recited for reassurance and encouragement in times of trouble. It uses a bird metaphor to remind the believer of the care of the Lord for the one who is in need of defense and covering.

There are, indeed, dangers around us, but, with God, they will not come near. The believer does have a responsibility in this event. He must believe and claim God as his dwelling place. When your faith is in Him, He extends his protection to you.

Because the believer has put faith in God, He is moved to protect and deliver the faithful from impending disaster. We are not to test God or seek His protection when we are not called by Him to a place of risk.

God intends to honor the faithful and blesses him with long life and Salvation.

Psalms 92

This Psalm is a tribute to music as a testimony to God. The writer is not recorded by name, but it is possible the writer was David or some member of the Temple choir.

He mentions the harp and the ten-stringed lyre as tools of worship. He also includes the voice as important in proclaiming God's works.
He lists joy and gladness as results of God deeds that are worthy of celebrating in song.

The writer celebrates the value of singing and music by citing the growth and strength of those who worship God. The Lord is my Rock, and there is no wickedness in him.

Psalms 93

Psalms 93 proclaims the majesty of God. It notes God's strength and the security of the creation he established. The writer hears his voice in the sounds of the sea, but God is mightier than the sea.

God's statutes stand forever. Holiness adorns God's house for endless days. I think that means forever.

Psalms 94

Psalms 94 opens claiming God to be an avenging force. He calls on God to rise up and pay back the proud. The writer names the sins the arrogant commit on the weak, the widow, and the foreigner. They deny that God's sees their behavior. They pour out arrogant words and the evildoers are full of boasting. He calls them "senseless fools," and he begins to address them calling to their attention that the one who made ears and eyes sees and hears them.

He uses rhetorical questions to probe their hearts and minds. "Does he who disciplines nations not punish?

In vs. 12 he begins a passage of praise for God's discipline and righteousness. The righteous of God will be your foundation. When my foot was slipping, your unfailing love supported me.

When anxiety overwhelmed me, your consolation brought me joy. He closes the psalm in the confidence that God's judgment is righteous and his love everlasting.

Psalms 95
This Psalm praises God from beginning to end. The call to the people is continuously reminding them of the times when they tested God and he proved faithful to hear them. He brought them through the Desert Wandering and gave them a land.

Come let us sing to the Lord. Let us bow down and worship. God called them and offered them rest. He said, "Do not harden your hearts."

He still calls to us. He still wants us to enjoy the glory of His Kingdom. Don't be wayward and arrogant. God is merciful and gracious. He is the Rock of our Salvation.

Read these Psalms and rejoice in God's goodness to us.

Sunday, April 9, 2017

Psalms 86-90

Psalms 86

This prayer of David is deeply sensitive and addresses his most profound needs. I was struck by the phrase in vs. 11. I find I need that "undivided heart" like David did. I have many concerns and needs pulling at my attention, but I pray to be focused on God and his glory so that I may serve Him wholly. 
I don't have foes like David did. No armed soldiers are lining up for battle, but the people and needs in my life pick at my desire to be totally devoted to God and His calls to me.

Vs. 15 through 17 reassure me of God's thoughts and intentions toward me. He abounds in love and His mercy and grace are ever extended toward me. I can see God's blessing on my life every day, and I am comforted by His joy and glory.

Psalms 87

This Psalm was composed by the author known as the Sons of Korah. There were three descendants of Korah. I don't know if they collaborated or if all of them used this designation.

Psalms 87 is a tribute to the City God called his own. Jerusalem was built on Mount Moriah and had been a place of importance as far back as Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18-20. In vs. 3 he addresses the City, recounting her glorious history.

Rahab was a woman of Jericho who hid the spies Joshua sent to search out the land before the people crossed the Jordan. She was given sanctuary with them in return for her protection of the spies. Babylon was the capital city of Assyria. Both these references have been used to refer to Egypt even though neither one has a political connection.

He lists other cities from history that are important as reference points to identify Jerusalem. Philistia, Tyre, and Cush are compared to Jerusalem, but they fall short of the glory of Jerusalem. He exalts' the fountains of Jerusalem. Water was always the important item when building a city. Jerusalem had all the important elements. 

 Psalms 88

This is written by the Sons of Korah directed to the Choirmaster to the tune of "The Suffering of Affliction." It is labeled as a Maskil, or, in some way instructive.

He cries out to God for his help and compassion. He fears he is going to die, and he asks God if the dead praise him. He still seeks God's guidance and help, but he seems to be without any hope but God.

He feels God has deserted him. He does not have a friend or neighbor to call on. He says God hides his face and darkness is his closest friend. In vs. 11 he mentions destruction and Abaddon. Abaddon represents destruction and the place of Sheol, the equivalent of Hell.

Psalms 89

This Psalm is written by Ethan the Ezrahite, which may be the same person as Jeduthun. He may have been a musician in David's court. This Psalm is longer than some, though it is not the longest. It is a Psalm of praise and adoration of God and His power.

He praises God's love which stands firm forever and his faithfulness to all generations.

The Heavens praise you, Lord. Who is like you, Lord God Almighty.

You rule over the surging sea. When the waves mount up, you still them. You founded the earth and all that is in it. Your arm is endowed with power. Your hand is strong and your right hand is exalted. I read this as a reference to Jesus as God's right hand.

He sees righteousness and justice as the foundations of God's throne and love and faithfulness going before him.

He pays tribute to David as God's anointed king of Israel. David is a metaphor for Jesus as the Son who will rule over His creation. His enemies will fall before him. God's faithful will be upon him, and through God's name, His power will be exalted. His throne will last as long as heaven endures.

If his sons sin and rebel, I will punish them, but my love will be with them forever.

Praise be to the Lord forever.

Read this Psalm and remember the promises of God to the loved ones of Jesus.

Psalms 90

This Psalm is notable for 2 reasons. It is the beginning of the fourth book of Psalms, and it was written by Moses.

I believe this was written at the end of Moses' life. He could not have seen the wisdom and patience it shows until he had walked with the Children of Israel in the desert. It also shows he walked with God in the desert for 40 years. 

Many memorable verses in this Psalm speak of God's love to us and reveal his patience and guidance in difficult places. 

A thousand years are like a day that has just passed or like a watch in the night. We don't need to fret over the time we feel we have wasted. God has it written in his log. It's new every morning.
Our days may come to seventy years or eighty, but teach us to number our days that we may gain a heart of wisdom

Make us glad for as many days has you have afflicted us. Show us your deeds and your splendor. May your favor rest upon us. Establish the work of our hands.

Vs. 17 pleads for the favor of God to rest upon us. The word translated favor may also be translated as beauty. I like that. May the beauty of God rest upon us as we learn to exhibit a heart of wisdom