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Saturday, April 15, 2017

Psalms 91-95

Psalms 91

This is one of the better-known Psalms. It is often read and recited for reassurance and encouragement in times of trouble. It uses a bird metaphor to remind the believer of the care of the Lord for the one who is in need of defense and covering.

There are, indeed, dangers around us, but, with God, they will not come near. The believer does have a responsibility in this event. He must believe and claim God as his dwelling place. When your faith is in Him, He extends his protection to you.

Because the believer has put faith in God, He is moved to protect and deliver the faithful from impending disaster. We are not to test God or seek His protection when we are not called by Him to a place of risk.

God intends to honor the faithful and blesses him with long life and Salvation.

Psalms 92

This Psalm is a tribute to music as a testimony to God. The writer is not recorded by name, but it is possible the writer was David or some member of the Temple choir.

He mentions the harp and the ten-stringed lyre as tools of worship. He also includes the voice as important in proclaiming God's works.
He lists joy and gladness as results of God deeds that are worthy of celebrating in song.

The writer celebrates the value of singing and music by citing the growth and strength of those who worship God. The Lord is my Rock, and there is no wickedness in him.

Psalms 93

Psalms 93 proclaims the majesty of God. It notes God's strength and the security of the creation he established. The writer hears his voice in the sounds of the sea, but God is mightier than the sea.

God's statutes stand forever. Holiness adorns God's house for endless days. I think that means forever.

Psalms 94

Psalms 94 opens claiming God to be an avenging force. He calls on God to rise up and pay back the proud. The writer names the sins the arrogant commit on the weak, the widow, and the foreigner. They deny that God's sees their behavior. They pour out arrogant words and the evildoers are full of boasting. He calls them "senseless fools," and he begins to address them calling to their attention that the one who made ears and eyes sees and hears them.

He uses rhetorical questions to probe their hearts and minds. "Does he who disciplines nations not punish?

In vs. 12 he begins a passage of praise for God's discipline and righteousness. The righteous of God will be your foundation. When my foot was slipping, your unfailing love supported me.

When anxiety overwhelmed me, your consolation brought me joy. He closes the psalm in the confidence that God's judgment is righteous and his love everlasting.

Psalms 95
This Psalm praises God from beginning to end. The call to the people is continuously reminding them of the times when they tested God and he proved faithful to hear them. He brought them through the Desert Wandering and gave them a land.

Come let us sing to the Lord. Let us bow down and worship. God called them and offered them rest. He said, "Do not harden your hearts."

He still calls to us. He still wants us to enjoy the glory of His Kingdom. Don't be wayward and arrogant. God is merciful and gracious. He is the Rock of our Salvation.

Read these Psalms and rejoice in God's goodness to us.